Producing milk powder in New Zealand – a novel take on utilising geothermal energy

Radio New Zealand reported last week on a rather interesting new take on utilising geothermal energy. With the aim of utilising geothermal energy to dry milk products, a group of Maori trusts is now building a first-of-its-kind milk processing plant in Kawerau, New Zealand.

Creating about 30 jobs, the plant is expected to start operating and produce milk powder by late 2018.

Poutama Trust project leader Richard Jones said to Radio New Zealand, that the plant will be turning cow, goat and sheep milk into powder. This can then be used to produce protein powder, vitaminised powder, as well as aged-care formula and baby formula.

There have been plans for this plant for several years, but only now was it see as feasible to start planning for it.

Bringing together, farming and the new dairy plant closer together it will highlights the environmental aspects and the utilisation of geothermal energy in a rather round story.

For further details see link below.

 

Source: ThinkGeoEnergy

Link: http://www.thinkgeoenergy.com/producing-milk-powder-in-new-zealand-a-novel-take-on-utilising-geothermal-energy/

 

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